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Courses

Courses available for the Fall 2019 semester:

History

HIST 100: The Silk Road: Central Asia in World History
Dr. Andrew de la Garza

HIST 100: Nazi Germany
Dr. Rich Frankel

HIST 100: History on T.V.
UL History Faculty

New this fall (2019) -- an introductory history course called "History on TV"! This HIST 100 course features study of how history is presented on television. Covering a variety of shows, time periods, and themes, delve into not only how history is made, but how it is presented. Browse through some sample weeks and propose your suggestion for a television show you think interprets the historical past (correctly or incorrectly) in the comments section below.

HIST 101: World Civilizations I

Survey of the origins and development of world cultures from prehistory to 1600.

HIST 102: World Civilizations II

Survey of the social, cultural, political and economic patterns of change in world societies from 1600 to the present.

HIST 103: Honors World Civilizations I

Survey of the origins and development of world cultures from prehistory to 1600.

HIST 221: The United States to 1877

Surveys the development of ethnic and cultural diversity in America, the establishment of national political and economic institutions, the early development of American ideals and traditions, and the formation of an expansionistic foreign policy.

HIST 222: The United States Since 1877

Examines selected economic, intellectual, political and social developments transforming post-Civil War and 20th-century American society.

HIST 223: Honors the United States to 1877

Surveys the development of ethnic and cultural diversity in America, the establishment of national political and economic institutions, the early development of American ideals and traditions, and the formation of an expansionistic foreign policy.

HIST 224: Honors the United States Since 1877

Examines selected economic, intellectual, political and social developments transforming post-Civil War and 20th-century American society.

HIST 307: History of Louisiana

From early exploration and settlement to the present.

HIST 311: The Ancient World
Dr. Carl Richard

The History of Greece and Rome explores the history and civilization of Greece and Rome from the Minoans to the fall of the Roman Empire.  Among the topics discussed are the political, religious, military, cultural, literary, and intellectual history of the classical civilizations that lay the foundation of Western civilization.

HIST 327: Twentieth-Century Russia and Beyond
Dr. Cheter Rzadkiewicz

This course focuses chiefly on the history of the Soviet Union and its aftermath. Among the topics treated are Russian’s revolutionary tradition, Lenin’s Bolshevism and the Revolutions of 1917, revolutionary utopianism during the1920s, the rise of Stalin and his “revolution from above,” “everyday Stalinism,” the Soviet Union in World War II, the Cold War, efforts to reform the soviet system from Nikita Khrushchev’s “thaw” to Mikhail Gorbachev’s “perestroika,” and, finally, the unsuccessful “August Coup” in 1991 and the subsequent demise of the Soviet Union. The course will also examine Russia’s rebound in the 2000s under the leadership of Vladimir Putin from its catastrophic condition in the 1990s and the nation’s prospects for democracy.

HIST 371: Tutor-Stuart Britain
Dr. Robin Hermann

This course surveys the extraordinary development of the British Isles from the late medieval period to the end of the Stuart dynasty in 1714. It will begin by addressing the social and political structures of late medieval England and how dynastic conflicts resulted in almost continuous internal warfare. It will then trace the rise of the Tudor monarchy and the split with the Roman Church, focusing on the relationship between church and state as Catholics and Protestants struggled for religious supremacy during the English and Scottish Reformations. We will examine the growth of the English state during the reign of Elizabeth and the evolution of monarchical, aristocratic, and parliamentary power. From there we will turn to the rise of the Stuart kings, the conquest and settlement of Ireland, overseas expansion in the Atlantic world, and the catastrophic civil wars of the mid-seventeenth century. Lastly we will focus on the rise of political parties and the shaping of constitutional monarchy and representative government as England and its Celtic neighbors merged to become Great Britain.

HIST 371: From the Depression to the Reagan Revolution: The United States, 1929-1980
Dr. Michael Martin

HIST 371: Issues in African American History
TBA

HIST 381: World Military History

Content varies. May be repeated twice for credit. Comparative exploration with emphasis on causes and effects. Theories of revolution, role of political repression, wars as catalyst of social change, and the role of subcultures and counter cultures.

HIST 390: U.S. Environmental History
Dr. Liz Skilton

Introduction to methods and sources involved in historical research, writing, argumentation, and oral presentations. Topics vary and will be selected by the professor.

HIST 471: History of U.S.-Middle East Relations
Dr. Chad H. Parker

This class is concerned with understanding how and why the United States got involved in the Middle East. What forces shaped American understandings of the region and its people? What has influenced U.S. foreign relations with the Middle East? How did the United States develop such a close relationship with Israel and what have been the implications of that relationship? Why does the United States seemingly always intervene in the Middle East and what impact have these interventions had?

HIST 471: Holocaust Memory

Dr. Richard Frankel

HIST 490: Histories of Race and Gender
Dr. Elise Franklin

This is a senior level research and writing seminar on race and gender in history. We will consider how race and gender shaped historical events on their own terms as well as how scholars have configured these analytical categories to make sense of the past. Each student will produce his or her own 20-25 page research paper from independent research and analysis that engages literature on gender and/or race. Area of study and time period of study open.

HIST 510: Introduction to Public History
Dr. Robert Carriker

Analyzes the application of historical methods and interpretation in various spheres of public history including museums, archives, corporations, preservation, digital media, historic sites, and community groups. Also investigates professional ethics, proposal writing, and advocacy.

HIST 515: The Ancient World
Dr. Carl Richard

The History of Greece and Rome explores the history and civilization of Greece and Rome from the Minoans to the fall of the Roman Empire.  Among the topics discussed are the political, religious, military, cultural, literary, and intellectual history of the classical civilizations that lay the foundation of Western civilization.

HIST 545:
Dr. Marissa Petrou

Content varies. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Includes use of archives and museums, application of archaeology and geography, historical editing and publishing, family and community history, material culture, and site interpretation, preservation and management. Alternate subtitles will appear on students’ transcripts.

HIST 561: American Readings: U.S. in the World in the Twentieth Century
Dr. Chad H. Parker

Content varies. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Examines seminal and recent developments in the writing of American history. Considers broad contours of historiographical change in methodology subjects, and interpretation rather than historical narrative. Alternate subtitles will appear on students’ transcripts.

HIST 590:
Dr. Ian Beamish

Seminar in the philosophy and theory of historical practice. Consideration of methods, functions, and schools of historical thought.

Geography

GEOG 103: World Geography

Introduces the basic concepts of geography while examining human activities in different regions of the world. Special emphasis is placed on the geographic factors affecting the development of nations.

GEOG 104: Physical Geography

Survey of the factors of the natural environment that are of vital importance to human life and activities.

GEOG 306: Geography of Latin America
Kathleen Espinoza

Survey of the physical, political, economic, and human geography of the region for the purpose of analyzing its economic potential.

GEOG 310: United States and Canada

Geographic examination of culture economy, natural and human resources.

GEOG 350: Louisiana
Kathleen Espinoza

Detailed study of a relatively small geographic area. Land forms, climate, and natural and human resources are considered from the standpoint of the role they play in influencing the economic and cultural potential of the state.

GEOG 375: (Political Geography): Political Ecology
Dr. Brittany Cook

Political ecology examines contemporary environmental issues in relation to economic, political, and social dynamics. In other words, this sub-field of geography explores the intersection of politics and the environment. Drawing on examples from around the globe, we will discuss issues such as land management and conflict, industrial production and environmental justice, agriculture and global food systems, and health and disease.

Philosophy

PHIL 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to the major problems of philosophy through a critical reading of selections from great philosophers.

PHIL 111: Contemporary Moral Dilemmas

Critical, philosophical examination of important ethical issues for individuals, the professions and society today. Includes: abortion, euthanasia, animal rights, and capital punishment.

PHIL 151: Honors Introduction to Philosophy

Introduction to the major problems of philosophy through a critical reading of selections from great philosophers.

PHIL 202: Critical Thinking

Introduction, inductive logic, logical fallacies, and basic forms of valid reasoning.

PHIL 316: Professional Ethics

Study of some of the moral problems encountered in the professions of business, medicine, law, and engineering; different conceptions of the nature and source of moral obligation in the professions.

PHIL 331: Philosophy of Religion
Dr. Keith Korcz

Does God exist? Is there life after death? We'll critically evaluate reasons. pro and con. See what saints, atheists, experts, and philosophers have to say about faith, the reliability of the Bible, creationism, the existence of God, and life after death. No prerequisites.

PHIL 321: Plato, Aristotle and the Ancients
Dr. Istvan Berkeley

This class looks at the history of ideas, from the earliest times, in the Western tradition. The class begins by examining the claims and arguments of the pre-Socratic philosophers, such as Thales, Pythagoras, Heraclitus and Parmenides. The class then looks at several works of Plato, including section from the famous *Republic* The class concludes with a discussion of important ideas and arguments from Aristotle.

PHIL 340: The Philosophy of Mind
Dr. Istvan Berkeley

This class will introduce students to major position in the philosophy of mind. These include Dualism, Behaviorism, Identity Theory, Functionalism and Eliminative Materialism. The class will include discussions of notorious difficulties, such as the notorious Mind-Body Problem. After the main position have been surveyed, attention will then be turned to Artificial Intelligence and discussions of whether it makes any sense to suggest that there may be artificial minds.

PHIL 361: Symbolic Logic
Dr. Micah Dugas

We will learn various methods to test whether an argument is valid or set of statements is consistent.  A very valuable class for anyone interested in improving their reasoning skills. Your thinking will never be the same!

PHIL 371: Philosophy and South Park
Dr. Micah Dugas

We will examine a variety of philosophical issues raised by the television series South Park, including critical thinking, religion, free speech, and social justice!

PHIL 428: French Philosophy and Politics 
Dr. Andrea Conque

Beginning with the seminal works of Martin Heidegger and moving forward to Derrida, Nancy, and finally Kristeva and other French feminists, students will carefully consider contemporary French philosophy and its relationship to the political.

Undergraduate Course Requirements

Masters Course Requirements